Tag: dahlias

Want to keep your team motivated?

 

go team go

We tackled the issue of whether incentives add to the success of a fundraiser back in this December blog, and our opinion was that it did in fact play a role and is beneficial on so many levels. Today we have compiled some great ideas to help you show your appreciation to your team and keep them motivated throughout your fundraiser.

1. No-Money Reward

Rewards with no cash value are proven motivators and provide great entertainment. A few examples include:

Pie Throwing: Allow the participants to throw cream pies at the organizers’ faces if the goal is reached! (you might not like this one but it usually gets the money raised)

pie in the

Camp Out: Have the principal camp out on the roof of the school or the group leader(s) camp out somewhere awkward if the goal is achieved. Set an even bigger goal to extend the number of days they must camp out there.

Activity of Choice: Let your group have an activity of their choice that replaces their normal schedule (for example: a free afternoon of sports activities in the school yard instead of class).

2.Raffles And Prize Draws

For each small goal attained (ex. for every 10 products sold or for every $100 in sales reached) the participant gets their name put in the raffle for various goodies! The more they sell, the more times they can have their name put in the raffle and the more chances they have to win.

3. Grand Prize For Your Top Seller

Reward your top seller with a Grand Prize. It may be movie tickets, cash or anything else that inspires your group members. Don’t get carried away and offer something your group can’t afford.

4. Rewards For Top Class or Team

This is a great way to motivate team work in your group. If you’re a small group, you can create teams by putting your members in groups of twos, threes or fours. If you’re a school you can do it by class and if you’re a league simply do it by team. You can offer the best selling group a free pizza party, a field trip outing to the place of their choice… ask them what they’d like. Try an ice cream social, everybody likes ice cream!

kids eating ice cream

 

5. Completion Prizes For Individuals

Offering individual completion prizes is very effective because they motivate and reward everyone in your organization. Offer a completion gift once your member raises a certain amount. For example: Receive $5 cash for every $100 of product sold. If your goal is a big one, completion prizes may be a gift certificate to a music, video, book, or sports store.

6. Reward Your Early Birds

This is a great way to help move your fundraiser along. You can offer early bird prizes to the first, second and third person who reaches a specific objective by a certain deadline. For example: if you run a fundraiser for 3 months, you can say the first three people that generate $500 in sales or more by the end of the first month will receive a $50 gift certificate.
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Before you know it, your team will be Fundraising Superstars, continuously looking to raise the bar to achieve their Fundraising Goals.

 

Team work

 

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How to Plant Summer Flowering Bulbs

How to Plant Summer Flowering Bulbs

Here we are! Spring has finally sprung and we are shipping out all the beautiful bulbs and seeds you have ordered over the winter. They are now ready to be planted in you gardens and pots! How exciting!
You will feel elated when you start planting and visualizing how your garden or home will look once the bulbs start to bloom.
We thought that there would probably be no better time than this to share a few tips on how to plant your lovely summer flowering bulbs.

Summer-flowering bulbs add drama to your garden from late spring right into fall. They are often tall, showy plants that have rich colors and make great cut flowers. Summer flowering bulbs have a way of illuminating borders and creating wonderful container garden displays. And like all bulbs, they are also very easy to grow. Simply put them in the ground and leave them to it!

However, there are some tips you can use to ensure bigger and healthy flowers. We will address planting the gorgeous dahlias our favorite flower here at Flower Power Fundraising, the ever so sweet lilies, the delicate irises, and dramatic gladioli!

Planting Dahlias

 

dahlia

Dahlias are highly productive plants that make great cut flowers. They like any rich soil with good drainage, so dig plenty of compost into the planting hole. You can also add a layer of grit on heavy soils to aid drainage. Dahlias are frost-tender plants, that’s why we start shipping when we are sure there is no longer a risk of frost in your area. Most people start dahlias off in pots indoors. If so, place the pots in a brightly lit spot and keep the soil moist. If you wish to plant dahlias directly in the ground, which is less work, bear in mind that they will flower a little later. You can also plant dahlias in containers. Use large, deep pots and general purpose compost. Add a slow-release fertilizer and plant as normal.
Pinch out the growing tips back to a pair of leaves once the plants are around 40cm high. This makes the plant bushy and encourages vigorous flowering.

Planting Lilies

lilies
Lilies add something special to the garden and thrive in pots and borders.Our Star Gazer lily has been a best seller for several years! They need a sunny spot and rich soil that doesn’t get waterlogged. Plant the bulbs as soon as you get them because they die if they become dehydrated. Lily bulbs need planting very deeply, up to three times the height of the bulb itself. If you want to grow them in pots, choose tall, deep containers and plant closer together than normal. The best flower displays come when the plant’s stem and flowers grow in full sun, but the bulbs are kept cool and shaded. Plant them deeply and add a mulch, or grow ground-cover plants around them.
Lilies are hungry plants and will need regular feeding. Add a high-potassium fertilizer like tomato feed every two weeks. Continue feeding after they have finished flowering to swell the bulbs for next year’s display. Stake tall lilies to stop the stems snapping in the wind. Tie them to garden canes with soft twine and loosen the ties when needed.

Planting Irises

dutch Iris mixed
Again, Irises like Dahlias are frost tender plants. You don’t have to worry about that because before we ship the summer flowering bulbs we make sure your state will no longer get frost, so it’s safe to plant irises once  you receive them. Irises are technically rhizomes, which is a clump of fleshy root. This means they should be planted near the soil surface, rather than deep underground like traditional bulbs.
Place the rhizomes just on the surface and cover the little roots with a soil. Position the crowns of moisture-lovers just below the ground.
Irises do not like to be crowded, so follow the spacing directions on the packet and avoid surrounding them with dense planting.
Irises need to be left exposed to sunlight after flowering – this is how they develop flowers for the following year. You can either remove the leaves when they wilt or leave in place for frost protection.

Planting Gladioli

gladiolus
Gladioli corms prefer light, sandy soils in full sun. You can add plenty of coarse grit if you have heavy soil, and line the bottom of the planting hole with a layer of grit too. You can also enrich the soil with a low-nitrogen fertilizer, but make sure it is well mixed in or it could burn the corms.
Plant the corms deeply (10-15cm) and leave plenty of space between them. Plant even more deeply on loose, sandy soils to stop plants being uprooted by the wind.
Keep well-watered, especially once the foliage appears. Apply a layer of mulch around plants in dry weather. Unless they are supported by surrounding plants, tall gladioli varieties will need staking.
If you are growing gladioli for cutting, plant a few corms every couple of weeks for a continuous supply. Cut the stems when the bottom flower bud is opening and the rest of the buds are showing color.
How to lift and store summer bulbs

Unlike hardy bulbs which are bulbs planted in the fall that bloom in the spring like daffodils and tulips, summer flowering bulbs, get damaged by frost and should be stored indoors over winter. Wait until all the leaves have died down at the end of summer. Lift the bulbs out of the soil with a garden fork, taking care not to damage them. Remove any dead or dying leaves and cut back the leaves or stems to within one inch of the bulb. Leave the bulbs out in the sun to dry out. Then brush all the soil off them. Store the bulbs in mesh bags in the shed or garage. They need air circulation to stop rot setting in. Keep checking the bulbs and remove any that start to rot so you can replant them in spring! Or start a new fundraiser and get a fresh new batch of different flowers 🙂

Happy planting everyone 🙂

 

What will you plant this spring?

Spring is a magical time. The weather is warming up, trees are beginning to bud and those bulbs you planted in the fall are now blooming with vibrant flowers. It’s also the perfect time to start spring planting to enjoy a colorful garden throughout the Spring, Summer and into the Fall!

Many gardeners can hardly wait to plant in the springtime, but it’s often tricky. Some plants may not survive the occasional frost that occurs in the early spring. With Flower Power we have done the due diligence in researching when the best time to plant is, and we ship your ordered bulbs and seeds just in time for planting so you don’t have to worry about frost.
So, which bulbs will you be planting this spring? If you’re still undecided, try some of our favorite flowering bulbs:

Rain Lilies
They make excellent cut flowers and, depending on the variety, will bloom from late summer into the fall. Rain Lilies or Pink Fairy lilies are known for their habit of blooming several times a season, usually about 3-4 days after it rains.

Rain Lilies

Dahlias
Dahlias always add drama to a garden with their spectacular height and impressive flowers. Dahlias bloom from summer to frost and can be grown in containers.
Try any (or all!) of our variety including Lilac time Dahlia, Arabian Night dahlias, the white Dahlia and more.

DahliasCloseup

Gladiolus
They make the perfect backdrop for shorter summer flowering plants. These stunning plants grow on sturdy stems that fill with countless blossoms.

gladiolus

Bleeding Hearts
Bleeding hearts form a bushy, upright mound of light green foliage that resembles leaves like a fern. It supports hundreds of bright pink and white dangling heart shaped blooms, considered the most unique flowers in nature!

bleeding hearts 2

What ever you choose, you cant go wrong! These beauties will stun and amaze you every time you take a peak at your garden or indoor pots!

Enjoy planting with Flower Power. It’s easy, fun and infinitely gratifying to fundraise with Flowers.

Fall Bulbs and Spring Bulbs

Fall Bulbs and Spring Bulbs

When fundraising with flowers, it is important to know when to plant the bulbs and when to expect them to grow. We thought we would address this topic to make it easier for everyone to understand and plant successfully.

We will start with a little background information.

What is a Bulb?

The word “bulb” is used to describe plants growing from an underground mass of food storage tissues. In other words, the storage tissue is like the bulb’s lunch box, packed with enough food for the whole growing season!

Bulbs are divided into two categories based on when they bloom.

Spring-flowering bulbs, such as daffodils and tulips, are planted in the fall.
Those are the bulbs you buy during the Fall fundraiser which starts in May and ends in October. You will eventually plant those bulbs in the fall and expect them to bloom in the spring, hence the name ‘Spring Flowering Bulbs‘.

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They are also called hardy bulbs because they survive cold winter conditions. In fact, they need exposure to cold temperatures in order to flower properly. The exact timing for planting hardy bulbs varies by region, but they need to be in the ground before it freezes.
Bulbs develop their roots soon after planting, and then lie dormant during much of the winter. When the weather begins to warm, they draw on that “lunch box” of stored energy to produce leaves and stems, and then flowers. Some bulbs, such as crocus, require fewer cold hours and less warming to bloom, so their flowers emerge in early spring. Others, including tulips, need a longer cooling period and warmer temperatures to emerge, so they bloom later in the spring. The differences among bloom times allow you to plan a bulb garden that will bloom for weeks and weeks!

If hardy bulbs don’t get enough chilling, they may not bloom at all or if they do, their flower stalks may be stunted. Some regions in the United States are too warm to successfully grow hardy bulbs. To find out whether your region is suitable for the bulbs you want to buy, you can head to our website, where we have all the information you need about your zone.
Summer-flowering bulbs, including dahlias and gladiolus, are planted in the spring. Those are the bulbs you buy during the Spring fundraiser which starts in January through till May. You eventually plant those bulbs in May and expect them to bloom in the summer, hence the name ‘Summer flowering bulbs‘.

Bulb Flowers

 

They are tender and do not survive cold winter conditions, so we plant them in the spring after the last chance of hard frost has passed, and enjoy their blossoms in the summer.

After planting, they grow much the same way as spring-flowering bulbs, and produce and store food for next year. Most keep their leaves and continue to photosynthesize until fall temperatures turn cool. In northern climates, gardeners must dig up tender bulbs and store them in a dark place that stays cool enough to keep them from sprouting prematurely. Where winters are warm enough, it’s safe to leave tender bulbs right in the ground. It is important to know the hardiness zone of your bulbs to determine the proper care.
We hope that we were able to shed enough light on the bulbs you buy during the Fall Fundraiser (Spring Flowering Bulbs) and Bulbs you buy during the Spring Fundraiser (Summer Flowering Bulbs). If you have any questions, please let us know! We have experts who can help you, not only with your fundraiser, but also with your gardening!

Happy Fundraising!