Tag: growing greens

Hardiness Zones-What Are They And What Do They Mean?

Hardiness Zones-What Are They And What Do They Mean?

Many novice gardeners have never heard of the term “hardiness zones,” or if they have, they have no idea what it means. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has divided North America into 13 different hardiness zones based on temperature and climate. Each one is labeled as zone 1, zone 2, through zone 13. Zone 1 is the coldest climate and zone 13 is the hottest. Each zone has a 10 degree differential, based on the average minimum temperature of the location. In other words, zone 1s average minimum temperature is 10 degrees colder than zone 2s. They then determine which plants grow best in which zone and recommend a hardiness zone for every plant.

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Hardy Plants are those that can be left in the ground safely all year even where frost penetrates deeply into the soil. Most of the beloved bulbs of spring (bulbs planted in the fall) are in this category – crocus, daffodils, tulips, and hyacinths. Lilies and many perennials are also hardy in most zones. It is important to know your hardiness zone, so that you can know what is hardy in your garden. The lower the zone number, the colder the zone. For example, Zone 2 is colder than Zone 3. A plant that is hardy to Zone 3, may not overwinter in a Zone 2 garden, unless given special protection. Bulbs benefit greatly from a 2″ to 4″ deep mulch of shredded bark or hardwood, compost or leaves. Mulch prevents the ground from alternately freezing and thawing, which can heave the bulbs out of the ground during winter. In summer, a mulch conserves moisture and suppresses weeds. Wait until the ground freezes before applying a winter mulch to fall planted bulbs.

Planting a bulb in its ideal hardiness zone is important. Just like you would never want to walk around in a shoe three sizes too small for you, a plant does not want to grow in a hardiness zone that is way outside of its comfort zone either. It can be too hot or too cold for the plant, which can result in it failing to thrive and grow. It can even cause the plant to die.

So you love a certain flower, but it isn’t hardy in your zone. Can you still plant it and have it grow? Absolutely! All flowers will grow in every zone, it is only when it is not hardy to your zone you must treat it like an annual and winter it.

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Wintering Bulbs

Bulbs and Corms that have a protective papery husk are easy to deal with. Simply dig up in the fall and shake the soil off. If the foliage has not quite died, leave the bulbs upright in a cool spot for a couple of weeks. Cut off the dead foliage and store the bulbs in old nylon stockings or mesh bags in a cool but frost-free area.bulbs

Summer blooming flowers with fleshy tubers or roots should be dug before frost and spread out in a shaded spot (like a garage) until the outside of the tuber feels dry. Then lay them in uncovered shallow flats or boxes filled with peat moss, sawdust or vermiculite. Check monthly to make sure they are not drying out and shriveling. They should stay plump until spring planting time, so you may have to sprinkle them with a little water to keep the right moisture. Too much water will cause mold.

tuber

 

 

Here at Flower Power Fundraising we ship all of our products according to hardiness zones. This fall we will begin shipping our fall bulbs to the cooler zones first working our way across the zones from coolest to warmest.

When spring shipping begins, we ship in reverse starting with the warmer zones and working our way across to the cooler zones.

Flower Power will see that you receive your fall or spring bulbs in ample time for planting.

Let’s get at it. Happy Planting!

 

 

 

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Are you ready to be a Hero?

Be a hero2

Fundraising is an important aspect of engaging children in civic minded activities from a young age. It creates awareness in a young person that they are part of a bigger picture. When they are raising funds for people in need or even their own school, it teaches them to appreciate what they have and to understand that they have the ability, even at a young age, to help others. This position entails a certain amount of responsibility and also self empowerment. It transforms the way they perceive themselves and allows them to do more and be more.
It is a fact that children who participate in civic or public service from a young age are more likely to carry on with that type of work into adulthood. On the other hand, if young people are being helped by others who are doing fundraising for a cause that affects them, they understand that there are people who care about them outside of their immediate circle. This can help them to have a greater sense of self-esteem and self-worth, which can lead to better life choices overall.

Though there are many benefits to fundraising, most people do not like to fundraise. Most think raising funds is hard, frustrating, bad for the environment and our children and sometimes even dangerous. This is not true if you are fundraising with Flower Power.

Fundraising with Flower Power is easy. You can reach your friends and family through a catalog fundraiser, an online fundraiser or both! And because we ship directly to the supporters, you can invite anyone/anywhere to participate in your fundraiser. This takes out the work involved in fundraising. You wouldn’t have to sort or distribute the products. You wouldn’t have to schedule pick up dates or handle supporter complaints, we will take care of that for you.

Fundraising with Flower Power alleviates any frustrations that come with fundraising. We have made our fundraising process as streamlined as possible and as simple as possible. All the hiccups that come with a regular fundraiser are eliminated. We also have expert customer service that can help with any questions and concerns. Whether it’s about setting up your fundraiser or even questions about planting, they are there happy to assist you every step of the way.

Fundraising with Flower Power is good for the environment and our children, because you are fundraising with earth friendly products namely, bulbs and seeds, of the highest quality. In fact, it helps rejuvenate the earth and helps us (adults and children) connect to our environment, allows us to fight childhood obesity and promotes physical activity.
Fundraising with Flower Power is safe. With many people now not opting to go door to door in their communities, we have included an online fundraiser that takes 15 minutes to set up and allows you to invite as many people as possible to support you anywhere in the U.S . It also allows you to post your fundraiser on Facebook for more exposure.

With all these advantages and the 50% profit you earn from every sale, the decision to fundraise with Flower Power becomes easy.

Let us help you reach your goals.
Let us help your children be Heroes for those around them.
Let us help you fundraise!

 

School Gardens

Thinking about building a garden for your school? Great idea! The benefits of adding a school garden are numerous and profound! Some of those include changing eating habits, improving test scores, connecting children to the environment, helping fight childhood obesity, promoting physical activity and changing attitudes towards learning.
All in all, school gardens are a great opportunity for fun and physical activity while serving as an important educational tool to help students understand how healthy food is produced.

School garden learning

Our first Lady Michelle Obama has been on a mission to encourage everyone to raise healthier children. One of the action steps she recommends is a school garden that would support all the goals that ‘Lets Move‘ campaign is trying to accomplish.

School garden-Michelle Obama

 

We couldn’t agree more. And with Flower Power you will not only have the bulbs and seeds to build your school garden, you will raise funds for school projects in the process as well!
Flower Power offers 50% profit on every sale you make! And the products are 100% guaranteed!

Flower Power has two programs, the Fall program, which we are currently in, offers ‘Spring Blooming Bulbs’ which you plant in the fall and see blooming in the spring. In the Spring program we offer ‘Summer blooming Bulbs’ and vegetables. From Tomatoes, radishes and lettuce to cucumbers, onions and beets! We also have green beans , carrots, zucchini and squash. For the fruit lovers we offer red strawberries and white strawberries. We also offer seed mixes that attract hummingbirds and butterflies, which can be a great topic of discussion with school children.

As you can see, it’s a ‘win-win’ situation, you build your school garden and raise funds for other projects at the same time.

Don’t forget to check out this checklist for building a school garden.

For more information on Flower Power Fundraising go to http://www.flowerpowerfundraising.com or call us at 1-888-833-1486

If you would like to get started and order Sales Supplies for your fundraiser, click here.

If you would like to build an online fundraiser, click here.

Happy Fundraising and Planting!

How to grow sprouts at home

We all want to get healthier, to age better, to reverse some of the harmful effects of daily life that bombards us from every direction.
Well, although this is not a panacea, it is a great start!
Providing your family with fresh homegrown greens throughout the year, is a great investment in their health and well being and it doesn’t get any easier than with the Two Tray Sprouter we have in the Flower Power Brochure.

Two try sprouter

Recently, I dug my 2 tray sprouter out from the back corner of the cupboard and I decided to try it. I wanted to see how easy it really was to start my own fresh home grown greens. Also, I thought it would be a wonderful experience for my two little girls to learn how to grow sprouts at home, watch them grow as they care for and nurture them and then eat what they grew. To our utter delight, the seeds started sprouting within a day and the process is just too easy! My favorite type of sprouts are Alfalfa sprouts, which is available in the Flower Power Catalog. They have a mild flavor, but my girls love the Broccoli sprouts, which are also available in the Flower Power Catalog.

Now, lets get down to business, how do you grow sprouts at home in a seed sprouter?

Pre-soaking the seeds.
You don’t have to pre-soak the seeds (we didn’t) , but if you do pre-soak them for a few hours, it helps them to germinate more quickly.
Here’s how you would soak the seeds: measure 1 tablespoon of seeds per tray. Pour the seeds in a glass bowl, cover them with water and let them sit for 3-4 hours. Drain the seeds. Pour them into the seed tray. One of the features I love about our Seed Sprouter is that there are drain holes on the bottom of each tray, which allows them to keep the correct amount of water in the tray at all stages of growth.
Place the Seeds in the tray.
We then put the seed tray on top of the base tray. Then, we took one cup (measured) of water and poured it on to the seeds. It took time to filter through the first time. The water will collect in the water collection tray (the white tray at the bottom). You can discard that water after it has drained to that collection tray. What I love about the seed sprouter is that there are 2 trays which allows me to grow at different timelines. So I can start seeds sprouting in one tray then a few days later start seeds in the next tray so that we have a continuous supply of those beautiful greens.

Watering the seeds.
We water the seeds up to 3 times a day. The girls water them in the morning as I am preparing breakfast for them. I water them again around lunch time and then after dinner. All you need to do is pour about one cup of water into the seed tray. The water will slowly drain out the holes in the bottom of the tray and filter into the base tray. Just remember to empty the base tray each time before you water or it will overflow. When sprouting more than one tray at a time, water the top tray and the water will flow down through the holes in the tray to water the next tray. The excess water ends up in the bottom base tray.

After you water each time and the water filters through , place the lid back loosely on the top tray.

 

two tray sprouter 2

Harvesting
Now, we haven’t yet gotten to that part yet, as you can see from the pictures they are not mature enough. But we’ll be able to eat fresh sprouts in a day or two at this rate! You can also let them grow as long as four or five days. To harvest them, remove the sprouts from the seed tray and place them in a bowl. Fill the bowl with water and swish the sprouts around. This will loosen up any seed hulls that will float to the top and you can scoop them out. You could skip this step but I was told that seed hulls can be bitter at times. Any seeds that did not germinate will float to the bottom. Scoop out the sprouts and place them on a towel to let the excess water drip off. Now you can eat your delicious homegrown sprouts!

Storing homegrown sprouts.
If you have any sprouts that were harvested and not eaten right away, put them in a covered glass storage container in the refrigerator. As long as most of the moisture is drained off, you can have them last up to four days in the refrigerator.

So, we have seen how easy it is to grow our own greens. The hardest part is remembering to water them 2-3 times a day. But, if you make it part of your routine, it will soon become second nature.
Go ahead now! Use that amazing 2 tray sprouter and feed your family cancer fighting greens that are full of antioxidants and iron. Every little bit counts 🙂

Update ( 13th of May)

Here is how beautifully the sprouts have grown! They are so fresh and peppery! Sometimes we cant even wait to wash away the hulls, we just eat it from the tray!

sprouts