Tag: Perfect Salad Garden

School Gardens

Thinking about building a garden for your school? Great idea! The benefits of adding a school garden are numerous and profound! Some of those include changing eating habits, improving test scores, connecting children to the environment, helping fight childhood obesity, promoting physical activity and changing attitudes towards learning.
All in all, school gardens are a great opportunity for fun and physical activity while serving as an important educational tool to help students understand how healthy food is produced.

School garden learning

Our first Lady Michelle Obama has been on a mission to encourage everyone to raise healthier children. One of the action steps she recommends is a school garden that would support all the goals that ‘Lets Move‘ campaign is trying to accomplish.

School garden-Michelle Obama

 

We couldn’t agree more. And with Flower Power you will not only have the bulbs and seeds to build your school garden, you will raise funds for school projects in the process as well!
Flower Power offers 50% profit on every sale you make! And the products are 100% guaranteed!

Flower Power has two programs, the Fall program, which we are currently in, offers ‘Spring Blooming Bulbs’ which you plant in the fall and see blooming in the spring. In the Spring program we offer ‘Summer blooming Bulbs’ and vegetables. From Tomatoes, radishes and lettuce to cucumbers, onions and beets! We also have green beans , carrots, zucchini and squash. For the fruit lovers we offer red strawberries and white strawberries. We also offer seed mixes that attract hummingbirds and butterflies, which can be a great topic of discussion with school children.

As you can see, it’s a ‘win-win’ situation, you build your school garden and raise funds for other projects at the same time.

Don’t forget to check out this checklist for building a school garden.

For more information on Flower Power Fundraising go to http://www.flowerpowerfundraising.com or call us at 1-888-833-1486

If you would like to get started and order Sales Supplies for your fundraiser, click here.

If you would like to build an online fundraiser, click here.

Happy Fundraising and Planting!

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From the garden to your plate!

From the garden to your plate!

carrots

The last post in our blog was about how to grow summer flowering bulbs. We thought it would only be fair to provide planting advice to those who have purchased the Salad Garden or Veggie Garden too!

We will start by touching on a few methods of planting and then sharing tips on growing some of our favorite veggies here at Flower Power.

Preparing your soil
Before seeding, make sure that the soil has dried out sufficiently before you work it. Make sure that the soil is warm enough for the seeds that you want to plant. Pea seeds, for example, grow in soil as cool as 40°F , so you can plant them as soon as you can work the soil in spring. Squash seeds, on the other hand, need warmth. If your soil temperature is much below 65°F , the seeds are likely to rot in the ground before they sprout. You can determine the temperature of your soil using a soil thermometer, which you can buy at you local garden store.

Methods of planting:

You can plant seeds in many ways. The method that you choose depends on your climate, your tools and your personal preference.

Row planting: Mark the placement of a row within your garden, and then make a channel at the correct depth along the row. Space out your seeds as evenly as possible because, thinning rows is less of a chore if you space seeds evenly. Cover the seeds with fine soil and then pat them in to make sure that all the seeds are in contact with the soil.

Wide row planting: This method allows you to plant more seeds in less space by concentrating watering, weeding, and fertilizing in a smaller area. Rows are generally 10 to 16 inches wide. Sprinkle seeds over the entire row. with most crops, try to land the seeds about 1/2 to 1 inch apart. For peas and beans, space them 1-1/2 to 2 inches. Cover small seeds with a thin layer of potting soil. Lightly pat the potting soil down again to bring the added soil into firm contact with the seeds.

Bed planting: Planting in beds is essentially the same as planting wide rows.

Hill planting: Plant seeds for vining crops that spread out, such as squash or cucumbers, in hills or circular groups. Loosen the soil in a 1-foot-diameter area, level the area, and then plant five to six seeds close together. Thin out all but the two strongest seedlings.

If your soil is heavy, you may want to plant in a raised hill, or mound. The raised soil warms up more quickly than the surrounding soil and drains better. Just don’t let the mound dry out!

Soon after seedlings grow their second set of true leaves, you need to thin them out to avoid overcrowding. The first set of leaves that a seedling produces are called seed leaves , which are followed by the true leaves.When you thin plants, either discard the extra seedlings or move them to another part of your garden.

Now that we covered the basics of planting veggies we would like to offer some our guide on some of our favorite veggies that we are growing in our gardens.

Green Beans

Choose an area with full sun and a rich, deeply worked soil with a pH level of 6.5. Plant 2″ deep on slight hills around poles or teepees spaced at 16″ apart. Grow 4-8 seeds on each hill. Space 3″ apart if growing on a fence. Sow when the soil is warm 65°F. Pole Beans are light feeders. The poles, teepees or a trellis should be set up after 2-4 leaves have developed. Keep the plants well watered in dry weather, especially if they are grown on an upright trellis or poles against a shed or house where soil tends to dry out. Pick young, full size pods when smooth and crisp. Pods are over mature once the beans start to form. Harvest regularly for a an abundant supply.
Cucumbers

Cucumbers are very easy to grow. They require full sun and soil pH of 6.0 to 6.8. As they are heavy feeders, an application of compost or well rotted manure worked into the planting area will help. Plant seeds ½-1″ deep.The Soil should be warm (65-75°F) for germination to begin. If you are growing them on a trellis, space them 18″ apart. The plant should not be allowed to wilt. Spread a mulch around plants before they start to vine, to cut down on weeds and conserve moisture. The mulch will also help to keep the fruit clean. Pick the cucumbers when they reach 6-8″ long. Keep mature cucumbers picked off the vines to encourage a longer yield.

Beets
Choose a full sun location. Beets require a light, well-drained, cool soil with a pH between 6.5 and 6.8. Compost or well-rotted manure along with pure wood ashes, as a supply of additional potassium, should be mixed well into the soil prior to planting. Keep well-watered as drought will result in tough or woody roots. Sow seeds thinly ½-1″ deep in rows spaced 8-12″ apart. Soil temperature should be  (65-75°F) for optimal germination. Thin seedlings 1″ apart for greens and 3″ apart for summer use of roots. Plant every two weeks, starting as early as soil can be worked until late June.Young and tender beet leaves can be used as greens. Dig or pull roots when 2-3″ in diameter or desired size.
Carrots
Carrots are best grown in full sun but will tolerate light shading. Choose deeply-worked, stone free soil with a pH of 6.5. Raised beds or rows are recommended. Sow seed ¼-½” deep. Seed takes 14-21 days to germinate. Thin plants to at least 1″ apart in rows spaced 18-24″ apart. Sow as soon as ground can be worked. Even moisture and soil temperature, 18-24°C (65-75°F) is essential for good germination. Carrots are light to moderate feeders. Avoid using fresh animal and green manures at the time of planting.
Peas

Peas need full sun to partial shade with a soil pH of 6.0-7.0. They are light feeders  and require a well-drained, rich and sandy soil. Work organic matter, including rotted manure or compost into the soil for best results.  Even soil moisture is essential especially during flowering and pod set.  As peas prefer cool growing conditions they may be planted as soon as the ground can be worked and will germinate in a wide range of soil temperatures, (40-75°F). Sow seed 1 to 1½” deep, 1-2 inches apart in double rows spaced 3-6″ apart, 24″ between the next double row. Plants will tolerate crowding so may be spaced 2″ apart. All peas are natural climbers, more productive, and not as susceptible to rot, if given some support or planted along a fence or trellis. For best tasting peas, harvest when pods are young and tender. Pick regularly to promote continued production.

If you have any questions or would like us to provide any information on growing any of the bulbs and seeds with in our fundraiser be sure to contact us on Facebook book or call us directly at 1-888-833-1486. We would be happy to provide any and all the information you need.

 

Happy Gardening!