Tag: summer flowering plants

School Gardens

Thinking about building a garden for your school? Great idea! The benefits of adding a school garden are numerous and profound! Some of those include changing eating habits, improving test scores, connecting children to the environment, helping fight childhood obesity, promoting physical activity and changing attitudes towards learning.
All in all, school gardens are a great opportunity for fun and physical activity while serving as an important educational tool to help students understand how healthy food is produced.

School garden learning

Our first Lady Michelle Obama has been on a mission to encourage everyone to raise healthier children. One of the action steps she recommends is a school garden that would support all the goals that ‘Lets Move‘ campaign is trying to accomplish.

School garden-Michelle Obama

 

We couldn’t agree more. And with Flower Power you will not only have the bulbs and seeds to build your school garden, you will raise funds for school projects in the process as well!
Flower Power offers 50% profit on every sale you make! And the products are 100% guaranteed!

Flower Power has two programs, the Fall program, which we are currently in, offers ‘Spring Blooming Bulbs’ which you plant in the fall and see blooming in the spring. In the Spring program we offer ‘Summer blooming Bulbs’ and vegetables. From Tomatoes, radishes and lettuce to cucumbers, onions and beets! We also have green beans , carrots, zucchini and squash. For the fruit lovers we offer red strawberries and white strawberries. We also offer seed mixes that attract hummingbirds and butterflies, which can be a great topic of discussion with school children.

As you can see, it’s a ‘win-win’ situation, you build your school garden and raise funds for other projects at the same time.

Don’t forget to check out this checklist for building a school garden.

For more information on Flower Power Fundraising go to http://www.flowerpowerfundraising.com or call us at 1-888-833-1486

If you would like to get started and order Sales Supplies for your fundraiser, click here.

If you would like to build an online fundraiser, click here.

Happy Fundraising and Planting!

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How to Plant Summer Flowering Bulbs

How to Plant Summer Flowering Bulbs

Here we are! Spring has finally sprung and we are shipping out all the beautiful bulbs and seeds you have ordered over the winter. They are now ready to be planted in you gardens and pots! How exciting!
You will feel elated when you start planting and visualizing how your garden or home will look once the bulbs start to bloom.
We thought that there would probably be no better time than this to share a few tips on how to plant your lovely summer flowering bulbs.

Summer-flowering bulbs add drama to your garden from late spring right into fall. They are often tall, showy plants that have rich colors and make great cut flowers. Summer flowering bulbs have a way of illuminating borders and creating wonderful container garden displays. And like all bulbs, they are also very easy to grow. Simply put them in the ground and leave them to it!

However, there are some tips you can use to ensure bigger and healthy flowers. We will address planting the gorgeous dahlias our favorite flower here at Flower Power Fundraising, the ever so sweet lilies, the delicate irises, and dramatic gladioli!

Planting Dahlias

 

dahlia

Dahlias are highly productive plants that make great cut flowers. They like any rich soil with good drainage, so dig plenty of compost into the planting hole. You can also add a layer of grit on heavy soils to aid drainage. Dahlias are frost-tender plants, that’s why we start shipping when we are sure there is no longer a risk of frost in your area. Most people start dahlias off in pots indoors. If so, place the pots in a brightly lit spot and keep the soil moist. If you wish to plant dahlias directly in the ground, which is less work, bear in mind that they will flower a little later. You can also plant dahlias in containers. Use large, deep pots and general purpose compost. Add a slow-release fertilizer and plant as normal.
Pinch out the growing tips back to a pair of leaves once the plants are around 40cm high. This makes the plant bushy and encourages vigorous flowering.

Planting Lilies

lilies
Lilies add something special to the garden and thrive in pots and borders.Our Star Gazer lily has been a best seller for several years! They need a sunny spot and rich soil that doesn’t get waterlogged. Plant the bulbs as soon as you get them because they die if they become dehydrated. Lily bulbs need planting very deeply, up to three times the height of the bulb itself. If you want to grow them in pots, choose tall, deep containers and plant closer together than normal. The best flower displays come when the plant’s stem and flowers grow in full sun, but the bulbs are kept cool and shaded. Plant them deeply and add a mulch, or grow ground-cover plants around them.
Lilies are hungry plants and will need regular feeding. Add a high-potassium fertilizer like tomato feed every two weeks. Continue feeding after they have finished flowering to swell the bulbs for next year’s display. Stake tall lilies to stop the stems snapping in the wind. Tie them to garden canes with soft twine and loosen the ties when needed.

Planting Irises

dutch Iris mixed
Again, Irises like Dahlias are frost tender plants. You don’t have to worry about that because before we ship the summer flowering bulbs we make sure your state will no longer get frost, so it’s safe to plant irises once  you receive them. Irises are technically rhizomes, which is a clump of fleshy root. This means they should be planted near the soil surface, rather than deep underground like traditional bulbs.
Place the rhizomes just on the surface and cover the little roots with a soil. Position the crowns of moisture-lovers just below the ground.
Irises do not like to be crowded, so follow the spacing directions on the packet and avoid surrounding them with dense planting.
Irises need to be left exposed to sunlight after flowering – this is how they develop flowers for the following year. You can either remove the leaves when they wilt or leave in place for frost protection.

Planting Gladioli

gladiolus
Gladioli corms prefer light, sandy soils in full sun. You can add plenty of coarse grit if you have heavy soil, and line the bottom of the planting hole with a layer of grit too. You can also enrich the soil with a low-nitrogen fertilizer, but make sure it is well mixed in or it could burn the corms.
Plant the corms deeply (10-15cm) and leave plenty of space between them. Plant even more deeply on loose, sandy soils to stop plants being uprooted by the wind.
Keep well-watered, especially once the foliage appears. Apply a layer of mulch around plants in dry weather. Unless they are supported by surrounding plants, tall gladioli varieties will need staking.
If you are growing gladioli for cutting, plant a few corms every couple of weeks for a continuous supply. Cut the stems when the bottom flower bud is opening and the rest of the buds are showing color.
How to lift and store summer bulbs

Unlike hardy bulbs which are bulbs planted in the fall that bloom in the spring like daffodils and tulips, summer flowering bulbs, get damaged by frost and should be stored indoors over winter. Wait until all the leaves have died down at the end of summer. Lift the bulbs out of the soil with a garden fork, taking care not to damage them. Remove any dead or dying leaves and cut back the leaves or stems to within one inch of the bulb. Leave the bulbs out in the sun to dry out. Then brush all the soil off them. Store the bulbs in mesh bags in the shed or garage. They need air circulation to stop rot setting in. Keep checking the bulbs and remove any that start to rot so you can replant them in spring! Or start a new fundraiser and get a fresh new batch of different flowers 🙂

Happy planting everyone 🙂

 

What will you plant this spring?

Spring is a magical time. The weather is warming up, trees are beginning to bud and those bulbs you planted in the fall are now blooming with vibrant flowers. It’s also the perfect time to start spring planting to enjoy a colorful garden throughout the Spring, Summer and into the Fall!

Many gardeners can hardly wait to plant in the springtime, but it’s often tricky. Some plants may not survive the occasional frost that occurs in the early spring. With Flower Power we have done the due diligence in researching when the best time to plant is, and we ship your ordered bulbs and seeds just in time for planting so you don’t have to worry about frost.
So, which bulbs will you be planting this spring? If you’re still undecided, try some of our favorite flowering bulbs:

Rain Lilies
They make excellent cut flowers and, depending on the variety, will bloom from late summer into the fall. Rain Lilies or Pink Fairy lilies are known for their habit of blooming several times a season, usually about 3-4 days after it rains.

Rain Lilies

Dahlias
Dahlias always add drama to a garden with their spectacular height and impressive flowers. Dahlias bloom from summer to frost and can be grown in containers.
Try any (or all!) of our variety including Lilac time Dahlia, Arabian Night dahlias, the white Dahlia and more.

DahliasCloseup

Gladiolus
They make the perfect backdrop for shorter summer flowering plants. These stunning plants grow on sturdy stems that fill with countless blossoms.

gladiolus

Bleeding Hearts
Bleeding hearts form a bushy, upright mound of light green foliage that resembles leaves like a fern. It supports hundreds of bright pink and white dangling heart shaped blooms, considered the most unique flowers in nature!

bleeding hearts 2

What ever you choose, you cant go wrong! These beauties will stun and amaze you every time you take a peak at your garden or indoor pots!

Enjoy planting with Flower Power. It’s easy, fun and infinitely gratifying to fundraise with Flowers.